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Jerry Goldsmith - Star Trek The Motion Picture (2CD) [EAC-FLAC]


    Seeders : 1      Leechers : 1

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Torrent File Content (42 files)


Jerry Goldsmith - Star Trek The Motion Picture (2CD) [EAC-FLAC]
    01 Jerry Goldsmith - Star Trek 20th Anniversary Edition
          01.- Jerry Goldsmith - Ilia's Theme.flac -
15.29 MB

          02.- Jerry Goldsmith - Main Title.flac -
8.7 MB

          03.- Jerry Goldsmith - Klingon Battle.flac -
24.85 MB

          04.- Jerry Goldsmith - Total Logic.flac -
15.3 MB

          05.- Jerry Goldsmith - Floating Office.flac -
4.57 MB

          06.- Jerry Goldsmith - The Enterprise.flac -
29.71 MB

          07.- Jerry Goldsmith - Leaving Drydock.flac -
18.41 MB

          08.- Jerry Goldsmith - Spock's Arrival.flac -
8.7 MB

          09.- Jerry Goldsmith - The Cloud.flac -
22.46 MB

          10.- Jerry Goldsmith - Vejur Flyover.flac -
22.34 MB

          11.- Jerry Goldsmith - The Force Field.flac -
20.79 MB

          12.- Jerry Goldsmith - Games.flac -
14.38 MB

          13.- Jerry Goldsmith - Spock Walk.flac -
20.54 MB

          14.- Jerry Goldsmith - Inner Workings.flac -
11.88 MB

          15.- Jerry Goldsmith - Vejur Speaks.flac -
11.43 MB

          16.- Jerry Goldsmith - The Meld.flac -
16.43 MB

          17.- Jerry Goldsmith - A Good Start.flac -
10.29 MB

          18.- Jerry Goldsmith - End Titles.flac -
19 MB

          BACK COVER.jpg -
669.03 KB

          FRONT COVER.jpg -
405.63 KB

          Jerry Goldsmith - Star Trek The Motion Picture.log -
7.7 KB

    02. Gene Roddenberry - Inside Star Trek
          01.- Gene Roddenberry - Star Trek Theme.flac -
8.26 MB

          02.- Gene Roddenberry - Introduction.flac -
4.96 MB

          03.- Gene Roddenberry - Inside Star Trek.flac -
4.14 MB

          04.- Gene Roddenberry - William Shatner Meets Captain Kirk.flac -
37.97 MB

          05.- Gene Roddenberry - Introduction to Live Show.flac -
2.22 MB

          06.- Gene Roddenberry - About Science Fiction.flac -
2.72 MB

          07.- Gene Roddenberry - The Origin of Spock.flac -
7.01 MB

          08.- Gene Roddenberry - Sarek's Son Spock.flac -
27.64 MB

          09.- Gene Roddenberry - The Questor Affair.flac -
14.28 MB

          10.- Gene Roddenberry - The Genesis 2 Pilot.flac -
9.44 MB

          11.- Gene Roddenberry - Cyborg Tools and ET Life Forms.flac -
16.25 MB

          12.- Gene Roddenberry - McCoy's RX for Life.flac -
23.05 MB

          13.- Gene Roddenberry - The Star Trek Philosophy.flac -
18.11 MB

          14.- Gene Roddenberry - Asimov's World of Science Fiction.flac -
24.39 MB

          15.- Gene Roddenberry - The Enterprise Runs Around.flac -
7.9 MB

          16.- Gene Roddenberry - A Letter From a Network Censor.flac -
21.29 MB

          17.- Gene Roddenberry - The Star Trek Dream.flac -
23.08 MB

          18.- Gene Roddenberry - Sign Off.flac -
2.92 MB

          Gene Roddenberry - Inside Star Trek.log -
9.08 KB

     Release.txt -
10.26 KB

     Torrent downloaded from Demonoid.com.txt -
47 bytes



Description



TRACKLIST

Jerry Goldsmith - Star Trek: The Motion Picture

01. Ilia's Theme 03:02
02. Main Title 01:23
03. Klingon Battle 05:27
04. Total Logic 03:44
05. Floating Office 01:03
06. The Enterprise 06:00
07. Leaving Drydock 03:30
08. Spock's Arrival 02:00
09. The Cloud 04:59
10. Vejur Flyover 04:58
11. The Force Field 05:03
12. Games 03:41
13. Spock Walk 04:20
14. Inner Workings 03:02
15. Vejur Speaks 03:50
16. The Meld 03:09
17. A Good Start 02:27
18. End Titles 03:17


ON THE MOVIE SOUNDTRACK (from Wikipedia)

The score for Star Trek: The Motion Picture was written by Jerry Goldsmith, who would later

compose the scores Star Trek V: The Final Frontier, Star Trek: First Contact, Star Trek:

Insurrection, and Star Trek Nemesis, as well as the themes to the television series Star Trek:

The Next Generation and Star Trek: Voyager. Gene Roddenberry had originally wanted Goldsmith to

score Star Trek's pilot episode, "The Cage", but the composer was unavailable. When Wise signed

on to direct, Paramount asked the director if he had any objection to using Goldsmith. Wise, who

had worked with the composer for The Sand Pebbles, replied "Hell, no. He's great!" Wise would

later consider his work with Goldsmith one of the very best relationships he ever had with a

composer.

For Star Trek, Goldsmith was charged with depicting a universe with his music, and so it is

extremely expansive. Goldsmith's initial main theme was not well-received by the filmmakers

(director Robert Wise felt "It sounds like sailing ships"). Although somewhat irked by its

rejection, Goldsmith consented to re-work his initial ideas. Star Trek: The Motion Picture is the

only Star Trek film to have a true overture, using "Ilia's Theme" for this music. Star Trek and

The Black Hole would be the only feature films to use an overture from the end of 1979 until the

year 2000 (with the movie Dancer in the Dark). The rush to finish the film impacted the music as

well; Goldsmith finished recording the score only five days before the release.

Much of the recording equipment used to create the movie's intricately complicated sound effects

was, at the time, extremely cutting edge. Among these pieces of equipment was the ADS (Advanced

Digital Synthesizer) 11, manufactured by Pasadena, California custom synthesizer manufacturer Con

Brio, Inc. The movie provided major publicity at the time and was used to advertise the

synthesizer, though no price was given at the time. The film's soundtrack also provided a debut

for the Blaster Beam, an electronic instrument about 12 to 15 feet long and played with an

artillery shell. Jerry Goldsmith used it to create the eerie signature V'Ger sound. Goldsmith

also utilized a large pipe organ, which required the score be recorded at 20th Century Fox (which

had the only scoring stage in Los Angeles equipped with such an organ).

REVIEW (by Bruce Eder, allmusic.com) ON THE 20TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Issued in 1999 after some considerable delay (and heavily available as a promo before that), this

double-CD set corrects a lot of the mistakes that were made on the original LP and CD releases.

For starters, there are about 20 more minutes of music from the film here -- Columbia Records

obviously wanted to hold the original LP release to one disc, but they still could have gotten

most, if not all, of the extra material on. The additional music isn't anything profound, because

all of the major thematic material was represented on the original LP and its CD equivalent --

it's mostly just more of the Vejur oscillations over dark orchestral chords, but anything that

gets more Jerry Goldsmith music into print is intrinsically OK. Indeed, listening to the full

score here, it is more apparent than ever just how important Goldsmith's score was to the

lethargically paced, deeply troubled film -- almost all of the majesty, excitement, and mystery

that the screen was supposed to present actually resides in the music, and Goldsmith probably

deserved an Academy Award, not just a nomination, for his contribution to this movie.

Additionally, one of the new tracks, "Spock's Arrival," may be the closest that Goldsmith has

ever come to writing serious music in a pure Romantic idiom; this could have been the work of

Rimsky-Korsakov or Stravinsky -- it's that good. And all of the music has been remastered in

state-of-the-art 20-bit sound, so the previously available parts of the score sound deeper and

brighter -- one also gets echoes of his score for Alien amid the sweeping orchestral passages.

The second disc is given over to the reissue of the mid-'70s Inside Star Trek LP, which was a

Columbia release -- it's mostly talk by creator/producer Gene Roddenberry with William Shatner,

Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, James Doohan, and Nichelle Nichols, with some comments by Isaac

Asimov, some theme music, and some sound effects. It won't tell you much that the interviews

accompanying the Sci-Fi Channel's rebroadcast of the uncut original series didn't, but it's handy

to have as an improbable CD re-release.

ON JERRY GOLDSMITH (from Wikipedia)

Goldsmith was born in Los Angeles, California, the son of Tessa (née Rappaport), an artist, and

Morris Goldsmith, a structural engineer. He learned to play the piano at age six. At fourteen, he

studied composition, theory and counterpoint with teachers Jacob Gimpel and Mario Castelnuovo-

Tedesco. Goldsmith attended the University of Southern California, where he attended courses

taught by veteran composer Miklós Rózsa. Goldsmith developed an interest in writing scores for

movies after being inspired by Rózsa.

Goldsmith provided tailor-made scores for many different genres; including war films (The Blue

Max), film noir (Chinatown), action movies (Rambo: First Blood and the first two sequels), erotic

thrillers (Basic Instinct), sports pictures (Rudy), family comedies (The Trouble with Angels),

westerns (Breakheart Pass), comic book adaptations (Supergirl), animated features (The Secret of

NIMH), and science fiction (Total Recall, Alien and five Star Trek films). His ability to write

terrifying music won him his only Academy Award for his violent choral/orchestral score for The

Omen. He also was awarded with Emmys for television scores like the Holocaust drama QB VII, and

the epic Masada, as well as the theme for Star Trek: Voyager.

Goldsmith also composed for The Waltons TV series (including its famous theme), a fanfare for the

Academy Awards presentation show and the score for one of the Disneyland Resort's most popular

attractions, Soarin' Over California. Goldsmith never cared for the term "film composer", as he

also wrote a fair amount of "absolute" music for the concert hall as well (such as "Music For

Orchestra", which was premiered by Leonard Slatkin and the Minnesota Orchestra in 1970).

Goldsmith was a lover of innovation and adaptation, and the use of strange instruments. His score

for Alien for example featured an orchestra augmented by shofar, steel drum and serpent (a 16th

century instrument), while creating further "alien" sounds by filtering string pizzicati through

an echoplex. Many of the instruments in Alien were used in such atypical ways they were virtually

unidentifiable. During the 80s, with the development of more sophisticated synthesizers and

technology such as MIDI, Goldsmith started to abandon acoustical solutions to create unusual

timbres, and relied more and more on digital instruments. He continued to champion the use of

orchestras however (to which, for him, electronics were merely an adjunct). He also remained a

studious researcher of ethnic music, and utilized South American Zampoñas in Under Fire, native

tribal chants in Congo, and interwove a traditional Irish folk melody with African rhythms in The

Ghost and the Darkness. His concept for creation and innovation delighted his fans -- and often

intimidated his peers. Henry Mancini, another film-music composer, once admitted that Goldsmith

"scares the hell out of us."

A list of his most distinguished film scores, most of which were Oscar nominated and all of which

exhibit his dramatic instinct, include Freud, A Patch of Blue, The Blue Max, The Sand Pebbles,

Planet of the Apes, Patton, Papillon, Chinatown, The Wind and the Lion, The Omen, Logan's Run,

Islands in the Stream (acknowledged by Goldsmith as his own personal favorite), The Boys from

Brazil, Capricorn One, Alien, The First Great Train Robbery, Star Trek: The Motion Picture,

Twilight Zone: The Movie, Lionheart, The Russia House, First Blood, Rambo: First Blood Part II,

Rambo III, Total Recall, Medicine Man, Basic Instinct, Hoosiers, The Edge, The 13th Warrior and

The Mummy. Goldsmith's Oscar-nominated score for Under Fire (1983) prominently featured solo

guitar work by Pat Metheny. Of all the scores he wrote, Goldsmith has said that Basic Instinct

was the hardest and most complex, according to a mini-documentary on the special edition DVD.

One of Goldsmith's least-heard scores was for the 1985 Ridley Scott film Legend. Director Scott

had commissioned Goldsmith to write an orchestral score for the movie, but was initially heard

only in European theatres, and replaced with electronic music and pop songs for the American

release due to studio politics (it has since been restored for DVD release).



INSIDE STAR TREK

TRACKLIST

Gene Roddenberry - Inside Star Trek

01. Star Trek Theme 01:31
02. Introduction 01:12
03. Inside Star Trek 01:04
04. William Shatner Meets Captain Kirk 09:11
05. Introduction to Live Show 00:25
06. About Science Fiction 00:40
07. The Origin of Spock 01:44
08. Sarek's Son Spock 07:20
09. The Questor Affair 03:49
10. The Genesis 2 Pilot 02:34
11. Cyborg Tools and ET Life Forms 04:05
12. McCoy's RX for Life 06:14
13. The Star Trek Philosophy 04:39
14. Asimov's World of Science Fiction 06:27
15. The Enterprise Runs Around 01:49
16. A Letter From a Network Censor 05:03
17. The Star Trek Dream 05:47
18. Sign Off 00:45

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